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Tenants

Tenant and Landlord Rights and Responsibilities

Tenant’s Responsibilities
• Pay rent and utilities according to rental agreement.
• Maintain the buildings in healthy condition.
• Place of garbage properly.
• Pay for fumigation of infestations caused by the occupant (e.g. fleas from a cat).
•Renter Use properly and maintain all electrical, plumbing, heating, gas, and other appliances providing by the owner.
• Do not cause deliberate or careless damage to the house.
• Do not allow “waste” (substantial damage to the property) or “irritation” (substantial interference like a dog barking all night) to persist.
• Upon moving out, restore the properties to the same condition as when the resident moved in, aside from normal wear and tear.
• Follow all written agreements in the rent or any other signed documents.

Landlord’s Responsibilities

• Maintain and repair the properties to obey with housing codes and regulations.
• Maintain structural components of the residence (roofs, floors, walls, fireplaces).
• Provide suitable locks and keys.
• Maintain electrical, plumbing, heating, and other machines in good working order.
• Keep the buildings in reasonably weather-tight condition.
• Control plagues by insects, rodents, and other pests before the renter moves in. The landlord must continue to control infestations except in a house (e.g., single family dwellings) or when the problem was caused by the renter.
• In apartments, studios, or any residences excluding houses, the landlord must provide trash cans and arrange for waste removal.
• Keep public areas such as lobbies, stairs and halls sensibly clean and free from risks.
• Make repairs to keep the unit in the same condition as when the renter moved in, except for normal wear and tear.
• Provide smoke detectors, and ensure they work properly when a new renter moves in. (Tenants are responsible for maintaining detectors.)
Damaged caused by the tenant is the sole responsibility of the tenant.

Landlord’s Admission to the Rental Property

The landlord must give the renter at least a two-day notice of intent to enter the property at reasonable times. The law states, however, that renters must not unreasonably refuse to allow the landlord to enter the rental when the landlord has given at least one day’s notice of determined to enter at a specified time to show the residence to prospective or actual buyers or renters. Renters also must not unreasonably refuse the landlord admission to repair, improve, or service the residence. In case of emergency, the landlord can enter without notice.

Repairs

When something in the property needs to be repaired, the tenants first step is to make a call to the landlord or the managing agent of the property. If that does not resolve the issue, then the problem can be put in writing to include the address and apartment number of the rental and a description of the problem. If possible, it’s a respectable idea to bring the notice personally. After giving notice, the renter must wait the essential time for the landlord to begin making repairs. Those acceptable waiting times are:
• 24 hours for no hot or cold water, heat, or electricity, or for a condition that is imminently risky to life
• 72 hours for repair of refrigerator, cooking range, and oven, or a major plumbing fitting supplied by the landlord
• 10 days for all other repairs
If repairs are not started within the acceptable time, and you are paid up in rent and utilities, you may take the following options:
• Move out. After waiting the necessary time, the English law allows tenants to give written notice to the landlord and move out immediately. Tenants are allowed to a refund of rent and deposit.
• Hearing or arbitration. A tenant can appoint a lawyer and go to court to force the landlord to make repairs to the property, or if the landlord decides, the problem can be resolved by a settlement service. Settlement is usually less costly and quicker than going to court.
• Hire someone to make the repairs. In many cases, the renter can have the work done and then take the cost from the rent. Before the work is done, the renter must submit estimation to the landlord. To get faster the repair process, the estimation can be given to the landlord along with the original notice of the problem. The total cost of the repairs that may be taken from the rent cannot overshoot the amount of one month’s rent.

Although what you may hear from trusted and well-meaning advisers, you should not keep back your rent payments until the landlord makes repairs. You could be asked to vacate the property for doing this. If you are experiencing issues, then do not hesitate to contact our office.

Moving Out

When you want to move out from a rental unit, it is important to give suitable notice to your landlord. In most cases it is not necessary to provide written notice if you are moving out at the end of the contract, though you should check the paperwork signed to decide the length of contract, and what notice period is required as per the contract.

If you leave before your contract expires, then you are responsible for paying the rent for the rest of the contract. However, the landlord must make effort to re-let the property out at a reasonable price. If this is not done, the renter may not be liable for rent beyond a reasonable period of time.
If you stay beyond the contract, with the landlord consent, then you are placed on a rolling monthly contract, with 30 days’ notice required. Written notice at least 20 days before the end of the rental agreement is required to move out.

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